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© 2020 Travellers Tasmania - Tasmania's Ultimate Travel Blog

1 JANUARY 2020

THE MOST PICTURESQUE

VIEW ON THE NORTH COAST

 -Braddons Lookout -

WELCOME TO OUR TRAVEL BLOG

Hello and welcome to the travel blog end of our website Travellers Tasmania.

We are both locals and island explorers, falling in love with all Tasmania for all it offers. We founded our blog when we realised some of the most amazing travel destinations were being overlooked. Bringing together travel destinations that are less known and explored, free and very photographable, we also want to share with you are adventures through this blog. 

It is not hard to understand why early settlers fell in love with the region when you stand and peer out across Forth Valley from Braddons Lookout, ten minutes drive from the port city of Devonport. 

Standing here, I try to envisage what it would have been like as an early explorer pre-colonisation. I imagine that after berthing their ship and after achieving any of the hillsides highpoints above the mouth of the Forth River, named Port Fenton, the views would make me to drop down my swag, swing up the tent and declare, 'I have found home'. 


As a writer and modern-day explorer in the year of 2019, I find my sincere appreciation for this place deepening. I have been one of the fortunate Tasmanian's to call this place my childhood home, and I felt it was the perfect place to return to as the launch of this blog. In my growing up years, and particularly now that I am aware of travel trends in our island state, I am still amazed at the number of travellers who have unknowingly passed this by; missing, in my opinion, one of the most picturesque views on the North Coast. 

 

From the lookout, you can start to understand how the valley became a settlers haven. Layered in chocolate soils and fed by the spring water of the Forth River, flowing from the Central Highlands, this region feels like the heart of the northern coast of Tasmania and its rich agricultural tapestry. For a few hundred years now, since James Fenton's arrival as the first settler, the trees were felled to build not only the new township of Forth and neighbouring Don, but Australia's second-oldest city, Launceston, and soon after, Melbourne. The soil was then turned to farming as more settlers braved the new colony at the bottom of the world, and those families grew. Today, some of those original families still carry on, along with the new, caring, nurturing and producing food in many different shapes and forms. 

As a travel destination from my writer's seat, and to any travellers who ask me what I would recommend, Braddons Lookout would be my number one recommendation. Only a ten-minute drive from Devonport, the port city of our island for the Spirit of Tasmania, it gives you that first, impressive impression of what our region is all about. In fact, when thinking about what our shared explorer instincts are, and certainly my own travelling habits  - not that dissimilar to those early explorers - finding that high point in a new destination is second nature, to better understand where we have arrived and where to go next.

 

As a starting point, viewers can see west and east along the north-west coastline and out across Bass Strait (somewhere over the bow of the horizon Melbourne lies). Views down into the Forth Valley showcase the village of Forth - one of Tasmania's earliest settled areas - surrounded by farmland and those first historic homes that still standing today. Looking south, Mount Roland stands tall and proud in the Sheffield region, and beyond, the mountains rise towards the Central Highlands where Cradle Mountain and the Overland Track begin.

 

As both a long-time local of Tasmania and having explored and lived in many different places around the island, this valley has it good. It feels like the pivot point of the North Coast, giving the traveller a host of different options no matter which direction they choose to carry on to.


 

Key distances:

12-minutes drive from Devonport

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- DESTINATION -

NARAWNTAPU - TASMANIA'S BEST KEPT SECRET

For those who fall in love and want to stay in the temperate weather of the Forth Valley region, there are a host of incredible experiences too. In fact, from Braddons Lookout, you can even spot some of them:

THING TO DO AND SEE NEARBY

BEACH

TURNERS BEACH

Distance from Braddons Lookout: 6 minutes drive

 

Arguably one of the best beaches on the northern coastline, Turners Beach is the place to go for a picnic, a therapeutic or romantic stroll or a swim. Depending on the time of the tide, the pure white sand stretches a few kilometres against the beating waves of the Bass Strait, with the beachside shacks sitting gently above the dune. Nearby, local cafes can also be found, see below for further details.


 

FOOD

THE BERRY PATCH

Distance from Braddons Lookout: 6 minutes drive

 

Cafe/restaurant, berry garden, yurts, refurbished buses and more are for the visitors who stop alongside the highway to grab a bite or refreshment. Primarily a berry farm, the owners have opened up one of the most popular chill-out and eatery spaces in the region. Always popular and busy, and always full of great vibes, this is a must for travellers keen to experience local Tassie produce from the region and just kick back and relax. 

 

http://www.theberrypatch.com.au 

LOOKOUT

LILLICO BEACH CONSERVATION AREA

FAIRY PENGUIN LOOKOUT

Distance from Braddons Lookout: 6 minutes drive

 

Forming the eastern stretch of the coastline below the hills which Devonport lies behind, Lillico Conservation Area is home to some of Tasmania’s little penguins. Depending on what time of year you are visiting, night tours are available for those keen on seeing some of our local wildlife. The Fairy Penguin Lookout, even if the penguins away, is still a great stop at, with beautiful views along the Lillico Conservation Area and the Bass Strait. 

 

SHORT WALK

DON RIVERWALK

Distance from Braddons Lookout: 7 minutes drive

 

Another local town which was settled early alongside Forth, the Don River was also an important river for the local economy in the early times. Now maintained as a natural vegetation area, the local council has formed a network of walking tracks either side of the Don River which connect through to the Devonport Bluff. A locals secret for walking, cycling and running, the Don river walk takes you alongside the river’s edge through the natural Tea-Tree bushland of the area. 

 

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